Real Estate Photography and Videography

house interior photographer

Photo courtesy:  fitsmallbusiness.com

When hiring a real estate photographer, you need to understand the equipment they use and the expected turnaround time. It would help if you also understood the advantages and disadvantages of hiring a photographer for your real estate projects. Read on for some valuable tips.  Here are some of them:

Several factors influence the cost of real estate photography and videography. Whether the real estate photographer is based locally or is freelance, the cost of a shoot will depend on the number of photos and the time involved. Real estate photographers often charge per square foot and may charge more for homes smaller than a certain number of square feet. Other factors that impact the price include the time required to edit more photos.

High-end listings require more time for a shoot and more editing time. Because they often feature sweeping views and unique design elements, high-end listings usually require more time for the photography shoot and the editing process. The cost of real estate photography and videography depends on the service provider’s skill set and experience. Many photographers offer flexible hours and are willing to take on more work if they can guarantee a quick turnaround time.

Before you begin, it’s important to have a few things ready to go. A camera is essential, as is a flash. A DSLR or a mirrorless camera should have a good sensor for the photography you will be doing, and a zoom lens should be available for your preferred focal length. A polarizing filter is also a must, as these can reduce glare and increase the saturation of colors. You can also use a neutral density filter to balance exposures between contrasting elements.

A tripod is an essential piece of equipment when shooting real estate. A tripod helps you level the camera and can blend multiple shots in low-light situations. This is especially helpful in exterior night shots or interior photos of poorly lit rooms. A good tripod is also essential for taking multiple exposures and capturing various images. A tripod can also help you get great angles and make multiple shots with a single exposure. A Godox (AKA Flashpoint) or a similar flash is also essential.

The turnaround time of real estate photography and videography can vary widely.  The process may require extensive edits, so you should consider charging more for advanced services. If the job is urgent, you may want to consider charging more, but this can strain your personal life. A few tips can help you find the ideal balance between price and turnaround time. In addition, consider the needs of your clients when setting rates.
The amount of time needed for a real estate photography or video shoot depends on the home’s size and the project’s scope. Generally speaking, the bigger the property, the shorter the turnaround time. A smaller property may only require one or two photos, while a larger home may require several more. Also, ask your photographer how many images are needed for the listing. Some photographers charge extra for quick turnarounds, so make sure you clarify this with them before scheduling the shoot.

Professional photographers have much better equipment than the one you own. Professional real estate photographers spend hundreds, even thousands of dollars on high-quality cameras, tripods, synthetic lighting devices, and editing software. They also have a higher level of expertise and knowledge. Hiring a professional photographer can free up your time for other tasks. It is also possible to increase your profits by hiring these professionals.

Getting a quote from several photographers is a great idea. Make sure that you balance price and quality. Higher budgets generally translate to better images. Also, ask about image rights, including whether the photographer will grant rights to brokerage companies and property owners. Ensure that you sign a contract in plain language with your photographer to avoid potential misunderstandings. Make sure you negotiate a contract with your photographer before deciding on the final payment.